Sign in with Google+ Sign in with LinkedIn

Do you have to be concerned about ticks in winter?

Winter_hiker_XS
Do you have to be concerned about ticks in winter?

Yes. Chances of getting Lyme disease can actually increase in winter, because people believe ticks are inactive. However, ticks have super powers and can even survive periods of being frozen underground.

There is undeniable healing power in nature. Getting outdoors restores the mind-body balance, increases a sense of well-being as well as the likelihood you’ll sleep well at night. A brisk hike in the fresh air is the antidote to being cooped up indoors.

Even better, mosquitoes and flies won’t bug you like they do in warmer months.

Ticks, though, are a different animal.

They do survive throughout the winter, according to Dr. Thomas Mather of the University of Rhode Island.

Ticks produce a sort of antifreeze to protect themselves from frigid temperatures. They are “back out and biting,” as soon as the weather warms and the ground thaws, observes Dr. Mather.

This doesn’t mean you should stay inside. Get the benefits of being in nature, just take precautions.


Checklist for outdoor activity:

- Wear long socks, appropriate footwear, and tuck your socks into your pant legs.

- Wear light-colored clothing including socks and shoes, to make tick checks much easier.

- Avoid brushing up against grasses, stay clear of woodsy areas, and hike in the middle of the path.

- Perform a routine tick check when you get indoors. Have another person check your hair and scalp.

- Check your pets. Dogs and cats and any critters who share your bed and your living space should also routinely be inspected.

- Wear DEET, but be forewarned, even it does not guarantee protection from tick bites.
Comments

Please visit our Facebook page

Screen Shot 2017-09-18 at 1.54.53 PM

Please visit and like our Facebook page and join in on the conversation!

Find out how others are dealing with Lyme Disease. Click below.

Comments

Chronic Lyme Disease

Here is a collection of articles on Chronic Lyme.

According to the CDC, what many call "chronic Lyme disease," is properly known as "Post-treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome" (PTLDS). Doctors can follow protocol and treat patients who have been diagnosed with early-stage Lyme. 

Read the collection on
Chronic Lyme here
Comments

A good diet for Lyme Disease

A good Lyme-literate doctor will suggest you supplement your treatment with a good diet. This is especially true for those of us with chronic Lyme symptoms. But when it comes to food, a lot of us do not like to change things up – creatures of habit, unite! However, change may be easier if you understand why it's necessary. 

Read the full article
Comments

What one food vegetarians should avoid when battling Lyme

You may be a vegan or vegetarian who eats soy products to increase your protein.

Nurse Jean Reist has treated Lyme patients in her Pennsylvania clinic. She explains the importance of protein in the diet.

Think of it as your weekly tasks of stocking your fridge with healthy foods and taking out the garbage. That’s similar to what occurs inside the lymph nodes on a regularly basis.

Critical trace minerals are transported by protein through the lymph system. If the patient’s diet lacks protein, the lymph system cannot properly do its job of delivering nutrients to the cells and taking out the toxins.

So she suggests vegetarians help out by adding a small amount of animal protein to their diet while battling the Lyme bacteria.

Eggs, whey, fish okay — but not soy.

Reist cautions against soy products because soy is high in copper. Lyme patients must also try to rid our bodies of an overload of metals, among them lead, aluminum, mercury, and copper.

Learn about
Lyme Disease and protein.

Comments